Right in the centre - Real help needed

By Ken Waddell

Neepawa Banner & Press

Our Canadian mainstream media should be ashamed of themselves.They are shallow, ever so shallow. There are exceptions, and while they might even resent being called mainstream, the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) does some of the best work in Canada in terms of finding the facts behind the stories.

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My perspective - A hidden problem

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson

Neepawa Banner & Press

For a quarter of Canadians, low literacy skills are holding them back and most of them don’t even realize they need help. Historically, we have thought about literacy in black and white terms— you can read, or you can’t. The problem is that in real life, literacy is more of a continuum; how well you can understand the words you’re reading, not just can you read them.

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Column like I see 'em - Does Canada still care about the CBC? Survey says!…

By Eoin Devereux

Neepawa Banner & Press

Are you familiar with the expression, “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure”? Well, let’s talk about the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

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Right in the centre - The Iowa disaster

By Ken Waddell

Neepawa Banner & Press

Monday was supposed to be a highly celebrated kick-off for the United States presidential election. The first round of candidate nominations took place in Iowa and is called the Iowa caucuses.

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My perspective - Failing to learn

By Kate Jackman-Atkinson

Neepawa Banner & Press

When we’re young, failing doesn’t really bother us. Babies spend months trying to turn over, sit up, crawl, stand, walk, then run and jump. No one expects a baby to skip over this progression, we know each step is the foundation for the next. When we go to school, while we may think otherwise, we don’t know much of anything that we will spend the next 12 to 20 years mastering. We have to learn to add, subtract and multiply, to speak another language, to play an instrument or conduct a science experiment. While we may pass our tests, at the beginning, we step into the class as failures. At some point, this changes and we stop seeing failure as a sign that we’re still learning and begin to see it as something that should be avoided at all costs.  

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